Myles Jury breaks down the expenses of an MMA fighter

Show up and fight for 15 minutes, and go home with $20,000.

You have heard your couch potato friend claim that it sounds like an easy payday, but UFC veteran Myles “The Fury” Jury puts things into perspective on his Team Fury Blog. Jury breaks down what really goes into fighting professionally and some of the costs involved with stepping into the cage and walking out with a paycheck.

Jury goes into detail and uses the UFC’s 2015 entry-level fighter pay of $10,000 to show up for the fight, and $10,000 to win as the basis of his example.

Jury’s recap of expenses and breakdown of what a typical entry-level fighter might pay out and is left with after a fight:

A fighter wins and earns $20,000:

$2,000 (gym / team)
$4,000   (management)
$6,000   (taxes)
$500     (medicals)
$1,000   (coaching)
$1,000   (Misc.)

Total Expenses: $14,500

$20,000 – $14,500 = $5,500 is the fighters profit.

Additional income received without deductions except taxes:
**Reebok uniforms pay UFC fighters anywhere from $2,500-$20,000 per fight
**UFC offers discretionary bonuses based on performance (not guaranteed)

 

A fighter loses and earns $10,000:

$1,000   (team)
$2,000 (management)
$3,000 (taxes)
$500     (medicals)
$1,000   (coaching)
$1,000   (misc)
Total Expenses: $8,500

$10,000 – $8,500 = $1,500 would be the fighter profit, putting him in a spot of needing to fight again ASAP.

Additional income received without deductions except taxes:
**Reebok uniforms pay UFC fighters anywhere from $2,500-$20,000 per fight
**UFC offers discretionary bonuses based on performance (not guaranteed)

Jury goes on to say that this is a hypothetical scenario and obviously varies from case to case, mentioning some of the top fighters can make 6 to 7 figures from a single fight. However, those elite level stars also likely paid their dues working their way to get to that point.

Now, how does that 15-minute fight look now? Tag your couch potato buddy and see if he’s still interested in getting that “easy payday.”